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❶The Cooper, Robinson, and Patall study reported similar findings:

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The Case Against Homework
Homework studies
The Case for Homework

Then there was a lot of activism against homework again in the s. The proponents of homework have remained consistent in their reasons for why homework is a beneficial practice, says Gill.

Second, it develops habits of independent study. It gives parents an idea of what their kids are doing in school. The anti-homework crowd has also been consistent in their reasons for wanting to abolish or reduce homework.

The more things change, the more they stay the same, it seems. There were also concerns about excessive amounts of stress. Also, a lot of the opposition to homework, in the first half of the 20th century, was motivated by a notion that it was a leftover from a 19th-century model of schooling, which was based on recitation, memorization and drill. Progressive educators were trying to replace that with something more creative, something more interesting to kids.

Cooper sees the trend toward more homework as symptomatic of high-achieving parents who want the best for their children. The communities in which homework is being piled on are generally affluent communities. Fortunately, there are some sanity-saving homework guidelines. In other words, 10 minutes for first-graders, 20 for second-graders and so on. Cooper has found that the correlation between homework and achievement is generally supportive of these guidelines.

Garfield has a very clear homework policy that she distributes to her parents at the beginning of each school year. It should be done within half an hour at most. I believe that children have many outside activities now and they also need to live fully as children. To have them work for six hours a day at school and then go home and work for hours at night does not seem right.

How do American kids fare when compared to students in other countries? World Culture and the Future of Schooling, that American middle-schoolers do more homework than their peers in Japan, Korea or Taiwan, but less than their peers in Singapore and Hong Kong. One of the surprising findings of their research was that more homework does not correlate with higher test scores. There is no time in school to read a book. A recent news article about the case against homework cited a high school teacher who said that she would tell her students to read no more than 15 minutes a day in their assigned novel Jane Eyre.

How stupid is that? How can anyone, young or old, get engaged in a novel if he or she spends no more than 15 minutes a day reading? At that pace, it seems like this class will be reading the same novel all year, if they manage to finish it at all. When else do students have time to write an essay or write a research report? In school, students may be able to write a few paragraphs, but it takes time to write an essay that is longer than a page. So consider where the anti-homework crusade will take us: The Journal described homework as "A National Crime at the Feet of American Parents" and claimed that children were "permanently crippled" by the pressure of schooling and homework.

Second graders, for example, should do about 20 minutes of homework each night. High school seniors should complete about two hours of homework each night. But some schools have begun to give their youngest students a break. A Massachusetts elementary school has announced a no-homework pilot program for the coming school year, lengthening the school day by two hours to provide more in-class instruction.

We want them to go to soccer practice or football practice, and we want them to go to bed. A New York City public elementary school implemented a similar policy last year, eliminating traditional homework assignments in favor of family time.

The change was quickly met with outrage from some parents, though it earned support from other education leaders. The most comprehensive research on homework to date comes from a meta-analysis by Duke University psychology professor Harris Cooper, who found evidence of a positive correlation between homework and student achievement, meaning students who did homework performed better in school. The correlation was stronger for older students—in seventh through 12th grade—than for those in younger grades, for whom there was a weak relationship between homework and performance.

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As kids return to school, debate is heating up once again over how they should spend their time after they leave the classroom for the day. The no-homework policy of a second-grade teacher in.

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Many students and their parents are frazzled by the amount of homework being piled on in the schools. Yet researchers say that American students have just the right amount of homework. Guest blogger Glenn Whitman, Director of the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning, suggests a scientific approach to manageable homework: students should do it without interruption, and schools shouldn't assign too much of it.

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If students do not want to study, then they have no homework (although choosing not to study might jeopardize their grades). The research I read found benefits for homework. Students do better in school if they have homework assignments and actually complete them; they get better test scores too. Homework for kids: Tap Your Feet: Understandably, some people can't concentrate with music playing. But if putting tunes on helps you plow through assignments, slip your favorite CD in the stereo or turn the radio on, and do your work to the flow of the melody.